Contact Us

Have a question or would like a free screening?

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Phone: 701-866-4934
Fax: 701-718-9141
3523 45th St S #100, Fargo, ND 58104
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© 2017 by Interact Speech & Feeding Therapy.

Services

Family Based Treatment

Our patients’ families are considered an essential part of the treatment team. Assessments and treatment plans include feedback from parents and caregivers. Parents are the primary decision makers in the child’s treatment. They will be guided in understanding their child’s areas of need and strengths as well as in how to assist in their child’s intervention including carryover at home, at school, and in the community.

An Interdisciplinary Approach

We can work as a team with all the contributors to your child’s education and care. We use assessments, reports and observations from other professionals in the child’s life including: physicians, teachers, psychologists, tutors, and physical therapists. We will participate with other team members to coordinate treatment goals, and to facilitate the most beneficial learning environment for the patient.

Treatment plans and goals are developed and implemented based upon your child’s needs.

Speech & Feeding Therapy

Language Disorder

Happens when a child has trouble understanding others (receptive language), or sharing ideas, thoughts, and feelings completely (expressive language).

Pragmatics (Social Skills)

The ability to follow social rules of when to talk and what to say. We use facial expressions and  gestures to express how we feel.

 Articulation Disorders

Children sound like they are making a "w" sound for an "r" sound (e.g., "wabbit" for "rabbit") or may leave sounds out of words, such as "nana" for "banana." 

Oral Motor

Works on the oral skills necessary for proper speech and feeding development by developing strength, coordination, movement, and endurance in the lips, cheeks, tongue, and jaw.

Fluency (Stuttering)

Often times is referred to as stuttering, fluency may include  repetitions of sounds, syllables, or whole words, as well as holding a sound. It could also show as hesitation, interjections of sounds, syllables, or words, or facial expressions associated with stuttering.

Dysphagia (Feeding Issues)

Difficulty with feeding and/or swallowing. This includes problems with using the mouth, lips and tongue to control food or liquid, and problems in the throat during swallowing.

Voice Therapy

A voice disorder may be characterized by hoarseness, vocal fatigue, raspiness, periodic loss of voice, or inappropriate pitch or loudness. Voice Therapy works to correct all those issues.

Auditory Processing Disorder

Unable to  recognize subtle differences between sounds in words, even when the sounds are loud and clear enough to be heard. Also sometimes have a hard time telling where sounds are coming from, making sense of the order of sounds, or to block out competing background noises.

Tongue Thrust

Occurs when the tongue extends out of the mouth or forcefully against the back of the front teeth when swallowing or talking.

Cognitive Development

The foundation of intelligence, which translates to the ability to learn or understand, or to deal with new situations

Augmentative & Alternative Communication Devices (AAC)

Working with various methods of communication that can help children who are unable to use verbal speech to communicate.

Home Visits

Here at Interact, we know how important receiving therapy services in the home can be. We're happy to travel to where you are to best suit the needs of your entire family.

Language Disorder

Happens when a child has trouble understanding others (receptive language), or sharing ideas, thoughts, and feelings completely (expressive language).

 Articulation Disorders

Children sound like they are making a "w" sound for an "r" sound (e.g., "wabbit" for "rabbit") or may leave sounds out of words, such as "nana" for "banana." 

Fluency (Stuttering)

Often times is referred to as stuttering, fluency may include  repetitions of sounds, syllables, or whole words, as well as holding a sound. It could also show as hesitation, interjections of sounds, syllables, or words, or facial expressions associated with stuttering.

 

Occupational Therapy

Sleep Issues

A lack of sleep can be caused by many factors and can impact engagement in daily life, participation, and occupational performance.

Activities of Daily Living & Self Care

Children who struggle with daily activities such as brushing teeth, self feeding, bathing, dressing, may have challenges with activities of daily living & self care.

Behavior Regulation

A child struggles with behavior regulation if they struggle with the ability to control their own emotions, behaviors or thoughts when upset.

Sensory Processing,
Self-Regulation

Child is sensitive to noise and light, and picky about what kinds of clothes and shoes which might be "scratchy" or "too tight."

Play & Social
Interaction Skills

Children are challenged when it comes to interact with others in social situations, or struggle to carry on conversations.

Visual Motor/Perceptual Skills

Children struggle with matching two objects that are the same, remember visual information, unable to find an object when surrounded with a busy background such as Where's Waldo, or the ability to identify when two things are the same when one part is missing.

Child struggles with the use of smaller muscles that help with buttons, tying shoes, picking up small things, or using pencils or scissors. The use of fine motor skills impact daily life.

Executive Function

A child has difficult time remembering things, staying organized, or finishing projects. Executive function is a cognitive skill that helps to break to break down tasks into smaller steps

Feeding Disorders

Child refuses to eat foods that are a certain food group, color, texture, or solids or liquids for a period of at least one month.

 

Physical Therapy

Toe Walking

A pattern of walking in which a child walks on balls of his or her feet, with no contact between the heels and ground. Common in children who are learning to walk. After the age of 2 most children outgrow toe walking and begin to walk with a normal heel-to-toe pattern.

Cerebral palsy

A congenital disorder of movement, muscle tone, or posture.

Developmental delay

The condition of a child being less developed physically than is normal for its age

Hip Dysplasia

An abnormality of the hip joint where the socket portion does not fully cover the ball portion, resulting in an increased risk for joint dislocation. Hip dysplasia may occur at birth or develop in early life.

Multiple diseases caused by a specific gene abnormality, with progressive muscle wasting, weakness and contractures.

Scoliosis
Motor Incoordination

A delay in the developmental process of being able to perform daily tasks that require motor skills.

Functional Balance/Safety

Functional balance is the integration of static and dynamic balance training to maintain or improve Activities of Daily

Scoliosis is a sideways curvature of the spine that occurs most often during the growth spurt just before puberty. Can be connected to cerebral palsy or muscular dystrophy.

Torticollis

A “twisting” of the neck caused by a tight neck muscle. This condition can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired.